MEASLES 2849 ~~ In fall of 1971 a white heifer with red ears and jaws sold in the WR sale for $170. The WR did not like white cattle; white was a reason to cull. Each year I would buy one heifer for each of our kids at the WR sale. Chad got Measles and the other WR heifers just rode into the sunset. Today, 43 years later, Chad still has cattle that trace back to Measles.

Measles, although white, started to get single red roan hairs her yearling summer. By her second year she shed off with larger roan specks and soon broke out with flashy specks all over. Her measling factor is as strong as the black of Don Quixote. If a critter goes back to Measles more than likely they will measle-up in white areas as they mature. To the opposite, some 15 year old cattle have large white areas of color with no specks. If measling is in the blood, it is a value trait. Everyone should breed for it.

Part of raising great cattle is to be able to turn down the highest offer. When Charlie Schreiner III saw Measles as a 3 year old he offered $1000 for her. T.D. Terry Kelsey offered a new duly truck for her which at that time was worth about $6500. As leading producers wanted to buy her see was retained by the Dickinson family and produced Cheetah, Texas Measles, Ranger's Measles, Texas Ranger Jr., Old Measles, Mr. Measles, all natural service or AI. By embryo she produced Tri W Delivery's Measles, Fantasy, and Rural Measles.

She was the youngest cow to grow over 50" T2T, she won every show entered and drew great appreciation to the Texas Longhorn breed. She was highly appreciated for her very correct conformation, trim type, perfect udder and drop dead color.

After producing a goodly set of genetics for DCCI, she was consigned to the Denver National Western sale in 1979. It was not that we wanted to throw her away, but we wanted to show the nation what a really great TL cow would bring. She was purchased by Montgomery, McCassland and Moore, a partnership, for $17,000, a record for any TL in history. Johnny Hoffman was the contending bidder.

Spring of 1979 Measles produced Measles Super Ranger who was her best siring son. Knowing it was a mistake to sell Measles I bought a half interest in MSR and bred him several years. For the partnership she was flushed at the DCCI embryo center and produced more breed leading progeny of that day, a lifetime total of 23.

When Jack Montgomery dispersed, Measles was purchased by Red McCombs and H. C. Carter for reportedly $200,000, still the highest price of any TL.

Although MSR, her favored son, was reported to have sired over 1500 registered progeny, the Measles daughter Ranger's Measles actually made the strongest contribution through All American, Emperor, Pring, Impressive, Sequel, Whelm Me, Northern Star, Rising Tide, Sena Me, Superior Symbol, Bail Jumper and Tri W Slide Rule.

Today the influence of Ranger's Measles and Measles can be located in the foundation pedigrees of Cowboy Tuff Chex, Respect Me, Top Caliber, Clear Win, Tempter, Drag Iron, Rodeo Max, Auze, Fifty-Fifty, Rim Rock, Sledge Hammer, Jamakizm, Over Kill, Sweet Brindle Dust and Hunt's Command Respect.

Photo: The Colorado State Fair in 1974 was the first major Texas Longhorn judged show. The original concept was the brain child of Edwin Dow of Fort Worth, TX. He wanted to make a very western show and an honest judged event. All the first shows were judged from stage coaches, buggies, dray wagons, and horse back. This was the original design to get spectator appeal and create huge crowds -- and it worked. The buggy is provided by Dr. Gene Naugel and the first judge was Garnett Brooks of Shamrock, Texas. Garnett was one of the two early TL inspectors for registration. After the first few years a move was made to go to some halter and some lose in order to get children involved. Gradually the western look was mostly abandoned.The Colorado State Fair in 1974 was the first major Texas Longhorn judged show. The original concept was the brain child of Edwin Dow of Fort Worth, TX. He wanted to make a very western show and an honest judged event. All the first shows were judged from stage coaches, buggies, dray wagons, and horse back. This was the original design to get spectator appeal and create huge crowds -- and it worked. The buggy is provided by Dr. Gene Naugel and the first judge was Garnett Brooks of Shamrock, Texas. Garnett was one of the two early TL inspectors for registration. After the first few years a move was made to go to some halter and some lose in order to get children involved. Gradually the western look was mostly abandoned.



Photo: Hunts Command Respect ~~ for some time the leading horn sire HCR was not available in frozen semen. In 2110 there was a special semen offer of 4 straws for $1200. Doug Hunt sent the 4 straws to DCCI. With just 4 precious valuable straws it was a serious thing to plan how to get the most of it. Right away 3 straws were used to flush the DCCI 86' T2T horned cow Jester. She flushed well. Two eggs were placed hot and the bull Jest.Com was born, now owned by Pat Smith of N.D. And a second bull, Jest Hunt who was purchased by David Brown. A frozen egg was placed in 2011 and a beautiful brindle speckled female, Jest Respect was born and resides at DCCI today. In 2012 the 4th straw was used on Win Glass and the bull Respect Win was born and is now for sale on the DCCI ranch inventory list. In 2013 three more of the Jester X HCR frozen eggs were placed in Buelingo recip cows and the calf pictured and two other speckled calves also resulted. Next week yearling Buelingo heifers will be prepared to receive the 7 remaining HCR X Jester eggs. Although nothing is certain with frozen embryos, we are hoping for 11 calves from the original 4 straws purchased. Our son Joel does all the AI and organizes the embryo flushes. In doing flushes at DCCI since 1979 we have found the weather is a big thing -- you can't fight the weather. In Ohio never flush during stressing cold weather. The months of April through October are normally not too hot and excellent results happen. Embryos are tender -- don't cook the eggs and expect them to live. Thanks Doug Hunt for providing 4 good semen straws on your HCR bull.Hunts Command Respect ~~ for some time the leading horn sire HCR was not available in frozen semen. In 2110 there was a special semen offer of 4 straws for $1200. Doug Hunt sent the 4 straws to DCCI. With just 4 precious valuable straws it was a serious thing to plan how to get the most of it. Right away 3 straws were used to flush the DCCI 86" T2T horned cow Jester. She flushed well. Two eggs were placed hot and the bull Jest.Com was born, now owned by Pat Smith of N.D. And a second bull, Jest Hunt who was purchased by David Brown. A frozen egg was placed in 2011 and a beautiful brindle speckled female, Jest Respect was born and resides at DCCI today. In 2012 the 4th straw was used on Win Glass and the bull Respect Win was born and is now for sale on the DCCI ranch inventory list. In 2013 three more of the Jester X HCR frozen eggs were placed in Buelingo recip cows and the calf pictured and two other speckled calves also resulted. Next week yearling Buelingo heifers will be prepared to receive the 7 remaining HCR X Jester eggs. Although nothing is certain with frozen embryos, we are hoping for 11 calves from the original 4 straws purchased.

Our son Joel does all the AI and organizes the embryo flushes. In doing flushes at DCCI since 1979 we have found the weather is a big thing -- you can't fight the weather. In Ohio never flush during stressing cold weather. The months of April through October are normally not too hot and excellent results happen. Embryos are tender -- don't cook the eggs and expect them to live.

Thanks Doug Hunt for providing 4 good semen straws on your HCR bull.



Rodeo Max - I was showing sale cattle to a couple from Texas and noticed Rodeo Max was limping on his right front. He was still madly doing his job, but with obvious pain. When this happens it may be he has pulled a muscle, perhaps stepped on something sharp pushing it up into his foot, maybe a knee injury-cartilage damage, or foot rot, or more crazy a gun shot. If you own enough cattle you will eventually see it all. When a bull hurts his foot he often stands in a creek or deep mud to reduce the pain. Rodeo Max had a limp and a foot packed solid with adobe mud. The cowboys slowly drove him a painful mile to the corrals, squeezed him, washed off his foot and up high, between his toes was a sharp chunk of coal pushed clear up in the cleavage of his toes. With much stress the coal chunk was removed, he was given an antibiotic and back to the job. Amazingly enough, he didn't even say thank you, but the cows seemed happy to have him back. So goes the night mare of loss of a valuable bull in the beginning of breeding season.


Photo: Classic Celebrity ~~ The famous early foundation cow Measles was bred to Texas Ranger JP 8 times. Of the three TR daughters, 'Cheetah' was bred to Don Quixote and produced Quixote Cheetah. She was bred to Classic and produced the colorful chocolate speckled $110,000 bull Rural Delivery and a lesser known son with more horn named Classic Celebrity. Although Classic Celebrity was a full brother to the highest priced son of Classic, his less desirable color left him in an unpopular second place. This photo was taken on the lawn of the DCCI Embryo Facility in 1984 when CC was a 3 year old. We turned him loose in the front yard and walked him around on the lawn until he struck a pose. Famous heart surgeon, Dr. Joe Graham purchased CC and used him at the Mi Tierra Ranch near Joplin, MO. Classic Celebrity sired Starlight Celebration, the dam of Zech Dameron III's famous clone cow Starlight. Thanks to Starlight not only were a bunch of beautiful clones produced, but also Awesome Viagra, Slick's Little Star, Starliner and then Tejas Star and many more. If anyone wonders where Starlight got her color, this is the way it works.Classic Celebrity ~~ The famous early foundation cow Measles was bred to Texas Ranger JP 8 times. Of the three TR daughters, "Cheetah" was bred to Don Quixote and produced Quixote Cheetah. She was bred to Classic and produced the colorful chocolate speckled $110,000 bull Rural Delivery and a lesser known son with more horn named Classic Celebrity. Although Classic Celebrity was a full brother to the highest priced son of Classic, his less desirable color left him in an unpopular second place.
This photo was taken on the lawn of the DCCI Embryo Facility in 1984 when CC was a 3 year old. We turned him loose in the front yard and walked him around on the lawn until he struck a pose.
Famous heart surgeon, Dr. Joe Graham purchased CC and used him at the Mi Tierra Ranch near Joplin, MO.
Classic Celebrity sired Starlight Celebration, the dam of Zech Dameron III's famous clone cow Starlight. Thanks to Starlight not only were a bunch of beautiful clones produced, but also Awesome Viagra, Slick's Little Star, Starliner and then Tejas Star and many more.
If anyone wonders where Starlight got her color, this is the way it works.




Right Hand Man ~~ In the late eighties I was showing Jet Jockey at halter. Richard and Louann Crist, of Scott City, KS, were showing an equally pretty bull named Right Hand Man. In the dozen shows prior to the TLBAA World 1988 show each bull would trade the All Age Grand Champion bull award. If the judge liked a pretty symmetrical head, very thick hip, thick forearm and beef conformation RHM won. If the Judge liked more T2T horn, a little more height and about the same conformation, Jet Jockey won.

Somewhere along the circuit RHM had an accident and crushed a testicle. It was determined to go ahead and castrate him to make a steer, then the Crists decided to just remove one testicle and try to save him for breeding. The first show was a flop -- the judge noticed it and RHM got a low placing. Next show Crists got a certificate of statement from the vet officially giving notice that RHM was a normal bull and genetically was okay, but had had a unique surgery. The next few judges received the official info and allowed him to win some more Championships. There was a lot of talk.

Jet Jockey and Right Hand Man faced off at the World TLBAA show. The championship hinged on one body part. As I was showing Jet Jockey, I noticed a representative of the authority walked out into the arena, talked to the judge and immediately Right Hand Man went down in the class and Jet Jockey was awarded World All Age Champion. Rumor was the "authority" told the judge in no uncertain terms that no bull with one testicle would ever be World Show All Age Champion.

Right Hand Man was huge in body, had about 42" horn T2T and represented a beef type of TL that was proving to the cattle industry that TL cattle were a competitive factor.

The Christs offered RHM for sale at auction. I encouraged George Wilhite to purchase him. I thought he was a bull that would make a strong contribution. George determined that several others were going to bid against him. He formed a partnership of the competitive bidders and bought him for $16,000. George immediately started doing ads to improve the tarnished RHM image. His adds were "IT ONLY TAKES ONE BALL TO MAKE A STRIKE."

Unfortunately RHM only sired a few calves and while servicing a Wilhite cow, under a large tree, during a lightning storm, a strike of lightning hit the tree, RHM and the cow -- dead at a young age. Today his polished skull hangs in George's library.

To show the fragile nature and importance of the foundation cattle, Right Hand Man sired one cow for Wilhite named TX W Rose Bud, she was dam of TX W Lucky Lady who was dam of Rio Grande who was sire of Rio Catchit, the dam of Cowboy Tuff Chex.

Now you know the rest of the story. Had it not been for one remaining body part, and a snap decision by the Crists, there would be no Cowboy Tuff Chex nor the whole Rio family. Every mating is important.


Photo: In 1984 DCCI had pastures in 6 counties of Colorado. Regular observation and 100% inventories were imperative. The minute school was out our kids all had jobs. Chad, at age 13 rode pastures with the senior cowboy Don Kraven. Don was known to be able to ride through a herd and hear every animal breath. When they were all breathing and accounted for the horses were loaded and the next pasture may be 40 miles away. If a cow needed doctored she was head and heeled, treated in the pasture and off to the next problem. There were places like here on the Quixote Ranch at Boone that cows would run in the brush and were hard to rope. If a cow could be driven out to an open area it was very important to catch her with the first loop because a second shot might take a lot of time to get her out again. If Chad missed a loop, Kraven had a John Wayne way of 'dog cussing' and with words of 'blue lightning' explained the stupid, ignorant, dumb, poor judgement, and horrible problem he had caused. Chad worked with all his heart not to miss a loop, but 100% catches under less than smooth arena conditions is difficult even for the best. This photo is Kraven doctoring an embryo recip cow with Chad holding her stretched. Chad would hear Kraven at the crack of dawn drive up to the ranch and he was gone for the day. He would get in after dark, eat supper, be dirty, sun tanned, red eyes, maybe a few rope burns, and be fairly quiet. After supper he would go out to the barn and practice roping a bucket for an hour or so and off to bed. Today 7 grand kids and 1 great grand kid were working on the ranch. Most worked the cattle with Honda 4X4s, some were sorting cattle for breeding pastures, some keeping records, some applying vapor ear tags, and life goes on at the ranch. Three of Chad's kids were working today. Chad is a builder in Georgetown, Texas. There are less rope burns in Georgetown.In 1984 DCCI had pastures in 6 counties of Colorado. Regular observation and 100% inventories were imperative. The minute school was out our kids all had jobs. Chad, at age 13 rode pastures with the senior cowboy Don Kraven. Don was known to be able to ride through a herd and hear every animal breath. When they were all breathing and accounted for the horses were loaded and the next pasture may be 40 miles away.
If a cow needed doctored she was head and heeled, treated in the pasture and off to the next problem.
There were places like here on the Quixote Ranch at Boone that cows would run in the brush and were hard to rope. If a cow could be driven out to an open area it was very important to catch her with the first loop because a second shot might take a lot of time to get her out again. If Chad missed a loop, Kraven had a John Wayne way of "dog cussing" and with words of "blue lightning" explained the stupid, ignorant, dumb, poor judgement, and horrible problem he had caused. Chad worked with all his heart not to miss a loop, but 100% catches under less than smooth arena conditions is difficult even for the best.
This photo is Kraven doctoring an embryo recip cow with Chad holding her stretched.
Chad would hear Kraven at the crack of dawn drive up to the ranch and he was gone for the day. He would get in after dark, eat supper, be dirty, sun tanned, red eyes, maybe a few rope burns, and be fairly quiet. After supper he would go out to the barn and practice roping a bucket for an hour or so and off to bed.
Today 7 grand kids and 1 great grand kid were working on the ranch. Most worked the cattle with Honda 4X4s, some were sorting cattle for breeding pastures, some keeping records, some applying vapor ear tags, and life goes on at the ranch. Three of Chad's kids were working today. Chad is a builder in Georgetown, Texas. There are less rope burns in Georgetown.
Longhorn Bios
Bios of Famous Longhorns
Foundation Sires Page 1
Foundation Sires Page 2
Foundation Sires Page 3
Foundation Longhorn Cows
Longhorn Info
Fun With Longhorns
Longhorn Legacy
Foundation Cattle
Longhorn Clones
Longhorn Biographies
Longhorn History
Management Tips
Mating Strategies
Marketing Tips
Longhorn Steers
Unique Longhorn Traits
Longhorn Inventory
Photo Reference Section
Quotes & Quips
In the history of the world, no one has ever washed a rented car.

Lawrence Summers

Political Quotes
It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.

Charles Darwin